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  • ” My favorite band growing up was and still is Oasis  – the best band in the world, no question,” said Parks, describing how McGee’s accolades made her feel, in an online interview with the Post ahead of her Israel debut this week on June 18 at the Barby Club in Tel Aviv.
  • ” I dropped out after my first year and kept taking photos, but also full-on pursued music with my whole heart.
  • They had one son, my father, and he also plays piano and showed me all of my favorite music growing up.
  • ” I met Anton in February 2014 on a trip to Berlin and we recorded a couple of songs,” said Parks.

Read full article: jpost.com

  • Beethoven to boogie-woogie, all manner of music will ring out in Ridgefield’s village as international ‘Make Music Day’ blossoms to raucous life on Main Street on Friday, June 21.
  • The Ridgefield Library will host a community sing-a-long with Cantor Deborah Katchko-Grey at 1 p.m.
  • Businesses that would like to host can register at the same site.
  • Make Music is a free celebration of music around the world on June 21.

Read full article: theridgefieldpress.com

  • Luberecki, who was named the 2018 Banjo Player of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA), is one of several renowned artists of the country and western style music to play banjos and mandolins made by Rosta Capek.
  • The Czech craftsman supplies instruments to the likes of 15-time Grammy winner Ricky Skaggs and Grammy nominee Doyle Lawson, both American bluegrass stalwarts.
  • His father founded and managed ex-Czechoslovakia’s first and only women’s bluegrass group, in which Capek’s mother played banjo.
  • Capek made his first banjo in 1985 when the country was still under communist rule.
  • Communist rule played a major role in the development of the local bluegrass scene and the music’s popularity.

Read full article: dailytimes.com.pk

  • Yesterday was the 40th anniversary of the release of Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures.
  • When Joy Division released Unknown Pleasures on June 15, 1979, people were a little confused by the packaging.
  • Instead, the all-black album featured this mysterious graphic.
  • 40 years ago today, @joydivision ‘s Unknown Pleasures was released.

Read full article: ajournalofmusicalthings.com

  • In April 1999 five boys from Ireland burst on to the music scene with their debut single, Sweat It Again.
  • The song became the biggest-selling debut single in history, and would be the first of 14 UK number ones for the group.
  • Like fellow 90s/00s popstars Take That and Steps, they haven’t just returned with their greatest hits, but a string of new songs to take on stage.
  • The post Westlife Twenty Tour review: Ballads, barstools and banter – the likeable lads from Ireland still have star power appeared first on inews.co.uk.

Read full article: inews.co.uk

  • ” The Real Thing” spawned a hit single, the rap-metal anthem ” Epic,” which went gold, netted its own Grammy nomination and became a staple of rock radio for years.
  • Its accompanying music video, which animal rights activists ripped for its footage of a dying fish, was an MTV favorite.
  • Other artists struggling to find a place for their own outside-the-box music, even despite their own solid track records, caught wind of the project and wanted in, including Osborne and the Melvins, who had been a massive influence on the grunge genre that spawned bands like Nirvana and Soundgarden.
  • As the industry becomes increasingly digital, Ipecac still puts a lot of time and care into its physical media releases, including compact discs and vinyl.
  • Even though the label was founded just as digital music platforms like Napster were altering the business, Ipecac’s fans still want something physical – ” like a fetishistic thing,” Patton adds.

Read full article: cnbc.com

  • Through the latter half of the 1970s, some areas of the music community were having a Marshall McLuhan-esque existential crisis thanks to the rise of synthesizers and the adoption of new studio technology.
  • In late 1978, Trevor Horn, an English session player and producer, sat down with keyboardist Geoff Downes and songwriter Bruce Woolley to write a new wave-ish song about music, mass media, and the way the public was being force-fed it all.
  • That was fine, but the version everyone knows is by The Buggles, which featured Woolley, Horn, and Downes.
  • Through the ’80s and ’90s, radio and music video channels lived side by side in a sometimes competitive, sometimes symbiotic state.

Read full article: globalnews.ca